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dc.contributor.authorCrom, Anne Maraike.
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-16T15:31:14Z
dc.date.available2013-09-16T15:31:14Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.date.issued2013-09-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11040/23821
dc.description136 leaves : illustrations.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Departmental honors in Economics.
dc.descriptionBibliography: leaves 130-135.
dc.description.abstractThe first part of the thesis identifies and closely investigates the persisting challenges to women’s professional advancement. Stubborn social traditions and the rigidity of the current business structure, which favors linear-careers, help to explain why few women reach the upper echelons of business. The business case for women in management is presented and a number of ways in which female contribution in upper management benefits the firm are outlined, including: increased innovation, better decision-making, a greater understanding of consumer preferences and higher profitability. A strong management team can be created if the company embraces the differences in leadership style between the genders. The classical model of economic theory, as well as discrimination theories are presented and their limitations observed. This examination shows that existing theories help explain much of the basic human market behavior; however, do not fully explain or address why women are under-represented in the upper echelons of businesses. The second part of the thesis provides potential solutions to the issue of continued female underrepresentation at the top. It observes measures that have been taken and suggests steps that can be taken by the public sector, the private sector and individuals in order to remedy some of the persisting barriers to women.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsThe causations. Society -- Women in the labor force -- Global social comparison -- Legislative history around gender equality -- Challenges and barriers -- Corporate culture and practice -- The business case for women in management -- Differences in leadership styles -- Challenging classical economic theory -- Discrimination theories -- Potential solutions. The public sector -- The private sector -- Flextime -- Personal responsibility.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (Norton, Mass.)
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.
dc.subject.lcshWomen employees -- Promotions.
dc.subject.lcshGlass ceiling (Employment discrimination).
dc.subject.lcshWomen employees -- Social conditions -- 21st century.
dc.subject.lcshSex discrimination in employment.
dc.subject.lcshWomen executives -- Cross-cultural studies -- 21st century.
dc.subject.lcshWomen -- Employment -- Legislative history.
dc.subject.lcshFeminist economics.
dc.subject.lcshWomen in the professions -- Interviews.
dc.subject.lcshBusinesswomen -- Interviews.
dc.subject.lcshWork and family.
dc.subject.lcshWomen executives -- Interviews.
dc.subject.lcshSex discrimination against women.
dc.subject.lcshLabor economics.
dc.subject.lcshWork-life balance.
dc.subject.lcshFlextime.
dc.subject.lcshExecutive ability -- Women.
dc.titleToo few women at the top : the causations and potential solutions for gender inequality in upper management.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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