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dc.contributor.authorO'Toole, Megan.
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T19:45:35Z
dc.date.available2013-09-17T19:45:35Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.date.issued2013-09-17
dc.identifier.otherW Thesis 1429
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11040/23828
dc.descriptionv, 36 leaves.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Departmental honors in Psychobiology.
dc.descriptionBibliography: leaves 31-33.
dc.description.abstractEarly attribution research suggests that when individuals view criminal behaviors as highly internal, controllable, and stable, they tend to support more severe and retributive forms of punishment. Although crime continues to be a top concern among American, such research has greatly slowed since the last major prison reforms of the 1980s. This study aims to reevaluate this topic by examining how lay people's attributions for crime relate to their perceptions of responsibility, emotions, and opinions on goals of punishment and support for prison reform. College student participants (n = 150) completed surveys presenting one of five criminal convictions scenarios. Correlational analyses and a path model provided strong support for links between internal and controllable attributions, high levels of anger and blame, retributive punishment purposes, and judgments against reform funding. Additionally, those with higher prison system knowledge and the politically liberal were more likely to agree that prison system change is necessary. The potential use of these data for prison reform activists is considered.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (Norton, Mass.)
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.
dc.subject.lcshAttribution (Social psychology)
dc.subject.lcshCriminal behavior -- United States.
dc.subject.lcshCriminal liability -- United States -- Public opinion.
dc.subject.lcshPunishment -- United States -- Psychological aspects -- Public opinion.
dc.subject.lcshCorrections -- United States -- Public opinion.
dc.subject.lcshCriminal justice, Administration of -- Psychological aspects.
dc.subject.lcshCorrectional institutions -- United States -- Administration -- Public opinion.
dc.subject.lcshPrison administration -- United States -- Public opinion.
dc.subject.lcshJails -- United States -- Public opinion.
dc.subject.lcshPrisons -- United States -- Public opinion.
dc.subject.lcshPrison reformers -- United States.
dc.titleThe effects of attributions for crime on attitudes toward prison reform.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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