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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Leah.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-13T18:06:54Z
dc.date.available2014-10-13T18:06:54Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.otherW Thesis 1462
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11040/23882
dc.descriptionii, 156 leaves.en_US
dc.descriptionBibliography: leaves 152-156.
dc.description.abstract"Although at the end of Beowulf the hero dies defeating a dragon, his victory is overshadowed by the gloom of the ending, which predicts the enslavement and extinction of his people. Beowulf critics have argued that the poet is using the doom of the Geats to criticize the hero or heroism. Whether they think that Beowulf should not have fought the dragon alone, or that he is the victim of old age, or that he should have left the Geats with an heir, their arguments ignore the fact that the death of the Geats is an essential part of the elegiac tone of the poem. By killing the Geats, the poet immortalizes the hero."en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (Norton, Mass.)en_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.
dc.subject.lcshBeowulf -- Criticism, Textual.
dc.subject.lcshBeowulf -- History and criticism.
dc.subject.lcshBeowulf -- Criticism and interpretation.
dc.subject.lcshLiterature, Medieval -- History and criticism.
dc.subject.lcshEpic poetry, English (Old) -- History and criticism.
dc.titleSadness in the heart of the good one : the tone of Beowulf.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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