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dc.contributor.authorClaflin, Caitlin.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-21T17:09:03Z
dc.date.available2016-03-21T17:09:03Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11040/24305
dc.descriptionvi, 58 leaves.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThe 1920s and ’30s in Great Britain saw the creation of the middlebrow, the emergence of popular psychology, and the Golden Age of Mystery Fiction. These three phenomena come together in the works of Agatha Christie. Christie’s use of psychology in her novels helped place mystery fiction in the newly created middlebrow category by reflecting middle class interests and concerns in interwar Britain.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsThe middlebrow, popular psychology, and mystery fiction -- The effects of popular psychology on the Hercule Poirot mysteries -- The effects of popular psychology on the Miss Marple mysteries.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (Norton, Mass.)en_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.
dc.subject.lcshChristie, Agatha, 1890-1976 -- Criticism and interpretation.
dc.subject.lcshPoirot, Hercule (Fictitious character) -- Fiction.
dc.subject.lcshMarple, Jane (Fictitious character) -- Fiction.
dc.subject.lcshDetective and mystery stories, English -- History and criticism.
dc.subject.lcshPsychology and literature.
dc.subject.lcshEnglish literature -- Psychological aspects -- 20th century -- History and criticism.
dc.subject.lcshMiddle class in literature.
dc.subject.lcshPopular literature -- Great Britain -- History and criticism.
dc.subject.lcshLiterature and society -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century.
dc.subject.lcshEnglish fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism.
dc.titleHuman nature : the presence of popular psychology in Agatha Christie novels.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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