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dc.contributor.authorTurner-Debs, Isabel
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-26T21:35:55Z
dc.date.available2018-02-26T21:35:55Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.otherW Thesis 1534
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11040/24481
dc.descriptioniv, 96 leaves.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: leaves 89-96.
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the complex imbrication of race and sexuality in the vampire figure during the course of its literary life. It examines traditional, nineteenth-century representations (Polidori's The Vampyre, Le Fanu's Carmilla, and Stoker's Dracula) of the vampire as monstrous because of its racial and sexual deviance as well as two twenty-first century reinterpretations of the vampire. The first of these is Stephenie Meyer's Twilight series, which reproduces the vampire as the ideal romantic hero through his whiteness and heteronormativity. The second of these is Octavia Butler's Fledgling, which reappropriates the vampire as black and sexually queer in order to challenge the normative systems of white privilege and heteronormativity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (Norton, Mass.)en_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.
dc.subject.lcshVampires in literature.
dc.subject.lcshVampires -- History and criticism.
dc.subject.lcshYoung adult fiction, American -- History and criticism.
dc.subject.lcshMeyer, Stephenie, -- 1973- -- Twilight saga.
dc.titleVampires as 'meaning machines' : signifying the monster through race and sexuality.en_US
dc.title.alternativeVampires as 'meaning machines'.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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