Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLewis, Carly
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-15T16:17:50Z
dc.date.available2019-04-15T16:17:50Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.otherW Thesis 1546
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11040/24553
dc.descriptionii, 97 leaves.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: leaves 94-97.
dc.description.abstractMy thesis argues that the rural setting of provincial England depicted in popular Victorian novels reflects corresponding political changes introduced by Parliamentary acts, such as the Reform Bills of 1832 and 1867. While there is an existing body of criticism on the rural English setting in Victorian fiction, critics generally have overlooked how these settings staged the rapid political and social changes that came with the rise of industrialism and the explosive growth in population. The Reform Bills proposed the redistribution of Parliamentary seats to underrepresented English counties, prompting questions regarding who was qualified to vote and who was not. Growing industrial towns like Manchester and Birmingham were given more seats, while smaller counties were deemed “rotten boroughs” and allocated fewer seats. Quite abruptly, geography and population mattered in a way they had not mattered before.As a result, authors and readers alike were attuned to the unprecedented relevance of location within the novel. Understanding the historical significance of setting in Victorian provincial novels allows us to read them not as works nostalgic for a simpler pre- Industrial era, but rather as literary creations that shed light on the shifting socio-political structures of rural England. In order to register the impact of these shifts, novelists experimented with different forms in genre and narrative: Eliot, for instance, embeds her third-person omniscient narrator among the townspeople of rural Middlemarch, while Gaskell utilizes the literary sketch to challenge the portrayal of the rural as timeless. To examine the complexity of the relationship between form and politics, I read George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Anthony Trollope’s Small House at Allington, and Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford alongside contemporary reactions to Parliamentary Acts, supplemented by theorists such as Terry Eagleton and Amanpal Garcha.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsChapter One: "All country towns are pretty much alike": Resisting ideological simplification in Eliot's Middlemarch -- 1.1 The reform act of 1832: Politicizing provincial England -- 1.2 Re: Form -- 1.3 Lydgate and middlemarch's "Petty politics" -- 1.4 "Put the figures and deduce the misery": Figuration and representation -- Chapter Two: Rewriting elysium in Trollope's The Small house at Allington -- 2.1 Innovating the pastoral -- 2.2 Villainous clerks and heroic hobbledehoys -- Chapter Three: Cranford's industrial resolution -- 3.1 Drumble to manchester: origins of Cranford's industry -- 3.2 Mary Smith: Industrial outsider -- 3.3 Industrial resolution
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (MA).en_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.en_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGreat Britain -- Parliament -- Reform -- History -- 19th century.
dc.subject.lcshElections -- Great Britain -- History.
dc.subject.lcshRepresentative government and representation -- Great Britain -- History.
dc.subject.lcshWorking class -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.
dc.titleFor love of countryside : politics, rural England, and the mid-victorian novel.en_US
dc.title.alternativeSpine label: For love of countryside.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record