Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSmith, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-15T18:42:26Z
dc.date.available2019-04-15T18:42:26Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.otherW Thesis 1553
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11040/24559
dc.descriptioni, 73 leaves: color illustrations.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: leaves 69-73.
dc.description.abstractInterdunal swales occur between sand dunes and support a relatively high density and diversity of plants. In the mid-1990s, data were collected on the plant communities of various swales at Sandy Neck in Barnstable, MA. The very same methods were repeated, 20 years later (in this study) in a unique attempt to quantify change in these swale plant communities over time. Distinct patterns of succession emerged, and the removal of the highly invasive Phragmites australis, or common reed, had no long-term impact on the plant communities of invaded swales.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (MA).en_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.en_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSand dune ecology -- Massachusetts -- Barnstable.
dc.subject.lcshSand dune plants -- Massachusetts -- Barnstable.
dc.subject.lcshSalt marsh ecology -- Massachusetts -- Barnstable.
dc.subject.lcshPhragmites australis.
dc.titleAssessing 20 years of change in the interdunal swale plant communities of Sandy Neck.en_US
dc.title.alternativeSpine label: Assessing 20 years of change in the interdunal swale plant communities.en_US
dc.title.alternativeAssessing twenty years of change in the interdunal swale plant communities of Sandy Neck.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record