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dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xinyi
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-14T15:49:39Z
dc.date.available2020-05-14T15:49:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.otherW Thesis 1566
dc.identifier.urihttps://digitalrepository.wheatoncollege.edu/handle/11040/31264
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 94-99).
dc.descriptionvi, 99 leaves : illustrations
dc.description.abstractThe Galactic X-ray binary SS 433 is the only known astrophysical object to exhibit strong relativistically red- and blue-shifted lines from elements such as S, Si, Fe, Ni. The X-ray emission lines originate in a jet outflow that is launched somewhere very close to the compact accretion (a black hole or a neutron star). During 2018 August 10-14, SS433 was observed using the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer system on the Chandra X-ray observatory. A total of 116 ksec of Chandra HETGS observation was made during 2018 August 10-14, which was split in one 20 ksec and one 96 ksec observation. The 20 ksec observation started at an orbital phase of 0.802, three days before an eclipse and the 96 ksec observation started at an orbital phase of 0.109 in the middle of the eclipse. The observations were designed to take advantage of the eclipse and carry out time-resolved spectroscopy and timing studies to infer spatial variation of physical properties such as composition, temperature, and density at different distances among the jet. In addition to phenomenological fits to determine properties of the observed emission lines, we will present results from fitting collisionally ionized plasma models. The observation indicates that the redshift of the western jet was 0.034 while the predicted redshift value is -0.0097. This suggests the independent motion of the two jets. The disappearance of the FeXXV line from the Eastern jet and the high photon index of the power law at the end of the long observation suggest the accretion might not has come out of the eclipse.
dc.description.tableofcontents1.1 The general introduction and the layout -- 1.2 X-ray binaries -- 1.2.1 Introduction to X-ray binaries -- 1.2.2 Accretion processes in x-ray binaries -- 1.2.3 The components of the x-ray binaries -- 1.2.4 Maximum luminosity during accretion: The eddington limit -- 1.2.5 Jets -- 1.3 Introduction to SS 443 -- 1.3.1 The moving lines -- 1.3.2 Relativistic jets -- 1.3.3 SS 433 as an X-ray binary -- 1.3.4 The uniqueness of SS 433 -- 1.3.5 X-ray observations of SS 433 -- 1.4 Some unanswered questions about the jets of SS 433 -- 2 The Chandra telescope and analyzing x-ray spectra obtained with chandra -- 2.1 Introduction to the chandra x-ray observatory -- 2.1.1 Main components of the chandra telescope -- 2.2 High resolution x-ray spectral analysis -- 2.2.1 Data preparation -- 2.2.2 Choosing the right fit statistic -- 3 Phenomenological modeling of our HETGs data -- 3.1 Introduction to our observation -- 3.2 The 20 ksec observation on August 10, 2018 -- 3.2.1 Method -- 3.2.2 Results -- 3.3 The 95 ksec observation on August 13-14 2018 -- 3.3.1 Results -- 4 Plasma model -- 4.1 Four-temperature plasma model -- 4.2 The 20 ksec observation -- 4.3 The 96 ksec observation -- 5 Discussion -- 5.1 Discrepancies in the observed redshifts of the jets -- 5.2 Line widths and positions -- 5.3 Jet emission line fluxes -- 5.4 Power law and photon index -- 6 Conclusion
dc.language.isoen_usen_US
dc.publisherWheaton College (MA)
dc.subjectUndergraduate research.
dc.subjectUndergraduate thesis.
dc.subject.lcshX-ray binaries.
dc.subject.lcshX-ray astronomy.
dc.subject.lcshEclipses.
dc.subject.lcshAstrophysical jets.
dc.subject.lcshAstronomy.
dc.titleUsing eclipses to probe physical conditions along the jet in SS433.en_US
dc.typeThesisen


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