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dc.contributor.authorZeiberg, Harrison
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-16T13:59:16Z
dc.date.available2022-05-16T13:59:16Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://digitalrepository.wheatoncollege.edu/handle/11040/32530
dc.description.abstractThe People's Party was the political manifestation of the Populist movement following the Civil War and Reconstruction and during the Gilded Age. "Rethinking the People's Party: An Examination of American Populism and Its Intersection with Race, Gender, and Religion" examines the question, how did the People's Party relate to people who were not white, male, and Protestant? This thesis has found that while the People's Party wanted to reform the American political and economic system to make it more equal, it did not want to radically change the social order of the United States, and so still upheld the principles of white supremacy, patriarchy, anti-Semitism, and anti-Catholicism. This thesis has also found that the People's Party valued political expediency and electoral victory over adherence to a set of principles.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipJohn Bezís-Selfaen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectPopulismen_US
dc.titleRethinking the People's Party: An Examination of American Populism and Its Intersection with Race, Gender, and Religionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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