Detection and Quantification of Tetracycline using Energy-Efficient Synthesized Carbon Dots

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Authors
Nerone, Sophie
Issue Date
2020-05-10
Type
Thesis
Language
en_US
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Undergraduate research. , Undergraduate thesis.
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Abstract
The use of carbon dots as sensors has increased in popularity and they have been found to be efficient fluorescent probes with high sensitivity and selectivity. The carbon dot synthesis efficiency was improved in this study. Carbon dots were then used to detect and quantify the commonly used antibiotic, tetracycline. Tetracycline is an oral, broad-spectrum antibiotic used to treat infections caused by gram-positive bacteria. Additionally, thermodynamic constants for the association of carbon dots and tetracycline (CD-TC) were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Job’s plot analysis showed that tetracycline and carbon dots display 1:1 stoichiometry. The binding constants, K, for the complexation were determined using a modified Stern-Volmer equation and yielded values 2.50 × 10^4, 1.04 × 10^4, 2.02 ×10^4, and 2.50 × 10^4 M-1 for 298.15 K, 303.15 K, 308.15 K, and 313.15 K, respectively. Thermodynamic analyses suggest that the CD-TC complex occurs spontaneously with DG being negative between 298-313 K. Both the enthalpy, DH, and the entropy, DS, of the reaction were also negative at higher temperatures (308-313 K) suggesting that the reaction was exothermic, enthalpy-driven, and the disorder of the isolated system decreased. However, at lower temperatures (298- 303 K) values of DH and DS were both positive suggesting that the CD-TC association was entropy-driven. Future work can include replication of this experiment for reproducibility and probing of other antibiotics with these carbon dots.
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58 pages; illustrations
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 35-37).
Citation
Nerone, Sophie. (2020, May 10). Detection and Quantification of Tetracycline using Energy-Efficient Synthesized Carbon Dots. Retrieved from:
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Wheaton College (Norton, MA).
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