The Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Reinfection and the Limits of Inherent Immunity

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Authors
Lannery, Kim
Issue Date
2021-05-15
Type
Thesis
Language
en_US
Keywords
Undergraduate thesis. , Undergraduate research.
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Abstract
SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is the cause of a global pandemic that has infected 155 million people worldwide as of May 2021.1 SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped and spherical particle that contains a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome. It is a beta-coronavirus (��CoV) belonging to the Coronavirdiae family. It originated in mammals, with the earliest documented cases being traced to bats.2 COVID-19 can spread through multiple forms of transmission but primarily spreads through respiratory droplets.3 SARS-CoV-2 enters the body and binds to the host’s ACE2 receptors. Once bound, TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates the viral spike protein. When someone is infected by SARS-CoV-2 their immune system works hard to fight the invader. The immune response produces antibodies and virus-specific memory T cells, such as CD4+ and CD8+.4 The antibodies that are produced during this response are believed to provide a certain level of immunity against future infection. The extent to which a person is immune is unknown and the duration for how long the SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies are present is unclear. This meta-analysis aims to study the reinfection cases of SARS-CoV-2 and to identify the likelihood of a reinfection event occurring, which is a step towards understanding immunity in SARS-CoV-2.
Description
61 leaves.
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 58-61).
Citation
Lannery, Kim A. (2021, May 15). The Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Reinfection and the Limits of Inherent Immunity.
Publisher
Wheaton College. (Norton, Mass)
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